Plant of the Month
November 2010 Plant of the Month — Euphorbia Print
Monday, 15 November 2010 00:00

Euphorbia myrsinites (Donkey-tail Spurge) 
Euphorbia, one of the about 300 genera to be found within the family Euphorbiaceae, is often overlooked as a herbaceous perennials in North America since most of the over 2,000 species within Euphorbia are tropical or subtropical in origin. The ubiquitous (in November/December) Poinsettia (E. pulcherrima)  is perhaps the most well known of the genus but with so many species there is an extreme amount of diversity. There are several species of more temperate origin that can add interest and variety to our colder landscapes.

Read more...
 
Plant of the Month — Aster Print
Thursday, 09 September 2010 18:46

Aster amellus 'Blue King'
The family Asteraceae (formally known as Compositae) is the largest grouping of the flowering plants with over 1600 genera including many favorites, all with daisy like flowers, such as Chrysanthemum, Heliopsis (Sunflower), Zinnia, Ligularia, Solidago (Goldenrod) and of course Aster, to name just a few.The family Asteraceae (formally known as Compositae) is the largest grouping of the flowering plants with over 1600 genera including many favorites, all with daisy like flowers, such as Chrysanthemum, Heliopsis (Sunflower), Zinnia, Ligularia, Solidago (Goldenrod) and of course Aster, to name just a few.
Read more...
 
March 2010 Plant of the Month — Veronica Print
Sunday, 28 February 2010 21:56

The color blue is highly valued in the ornamental landscape chiefly because of its rarity, there are so few plants with blue flowers. One genus that is able to supply this need in the garden is Veronica. A relatively large genus with over 500 species Veronica was formerly classified as being within the Scrophulariaceae family but has recently been reclassified to the plantain family or Plantaginaceae.

Phylogenetic research (DNA testing) has indicated that the formerly rich and diverse Scrophulariaceae be divested of the majority of its 275 genera (over 5000 species) leaving Scrophularia, Verbascum, Diascia and Buddleia as the most familiar of about 60 genera. Plantaginaceae, previously best known for the lowly Plantago or Plantain (the common weed of containers and gardens, not to be confused with the banana plantain) now shelters over 90 diverse genera the most recognizable of which are Antirrhinum, Bacopa, Chelone, Digitalis, Veronicastrum and of course Veronica. Rarely has anyone accused taxonomists of a desire to simplify any situation that comes to their attention.

Read more...
 
February 2010 Plant of the Month — Viburnum Print
Monday, 01 February 2010 20:34
Of all the flowering shrubs available for the North American garden, Viburnum are underrated by the majority, but they have a dedicated core of knowledgeable fans who would not be without them.  Indeed their floral display, usually followed by a magnificent show of fruit, should put them on everyone’s ‘must have’ list.  They are most often listed as being members of the family Caprifoliaceae (Honeysuckle) along with other familiar genera such as Lonicera, Weigelia and Heptocodium.  However, based on DNA studies, there is talk of moving both Viburnum and Sambucus into the Adoxaceae family.  Only time will tell as to when this taxonomic change will become prevalent. 
Read more...
 
January 2010 Plant of the Month — Hydrangea Print
Tuesday, 22 December 2009 20:23
There are about 70 recognized species of Hydrangea.Traditionally the Plant of the Month explores a genus of herbaceous perennial, but in a daring departure this month’s subject is the genus Hydrangea and a closer look at some of the newer cultivars. Lately, has been a wonderful resurgence of interest in these beautiful woody shrubs. Not surprisingly this genus falls within the family Hydrangeaceae which also includes the well-known genera Deutsia and Philadelphus and the perhaps less familiar but eminently garden-worthy, Schizophragma, Decumaria, and Kirengeshoma.  There are about 70 recognized species of Hydrangea, most of which are native to Asia, but there are a few that call North America home. Generally the foliage is opposite on the stems and the seeds are contained within a capsule or berry. The name Hydrangea comes from the Greek for “water vessel” in reference to the shape of the fruit.
Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 4